• Daniel GreenLeaf

Sneak Peek: A Look into Tesla’s Efforts to Diversify


Elon Musk’s Tesla is one of the world’s largest and most recognizable electric car companies. With Forbes ranking Musk as the second richest man in the world, the South African-born billionaire has transformed the automotive industry into a technological center for creativity and innovation. With production beginning on the Tesla Cyber truck and with new solar panel technologies, Musk has been forced to expand his production into Germany and Texas with new factories expected to open at the end of 2021. But who will be the new workers at these factories? Today, we take a sneak peek into Tesla’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Impact Report and make predictions about Tesla’s future in tech along with its efforts to diversify its workforce.



Founded in 2003, Tesla's mission has always been to “accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy” through a “relentless” focus on innovation, teamwork collaboration, and commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Tesla is a proud majority-minority company with Black, African American, Hispanic, Latinx, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native communities making up nearly 60% of the U.S Tesla workforce. Currently, 33% of Tesla’s Directors and Vice Presidents are from underrepresented communities which is a large representation of a small cohort with only .4% of Tesla’s employees reporting directly to the CEO. According to the impact report, Tesla will continue to promote inclusion and diversification especially amongst women which is a top priority in the company in 2021.



Tesla has seven Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) which aim at “connecting communities to one another to create a sense of belonging and fostering access to opportunity”. The seven EGRs include Black at Tesla, Latinos at Tesla, LGBTQ at Tesla, Women in Tesla, Veterans at Tesla, Intersectionality, and Asian Pacific Islanders at Tesla. These seven EGRs are represented at all 32 locations across Tesla and have been applauded by managers and directors as sources of community engagement and workplace inclusion.



What we can expect from Tesla in the upcoming year is a similar approach to what has worked in the past. We can assume that many of the new locations will become majority-minority workplaces where underrepresented communities will be the main driving force. We can also assume that Tesla will begin to push for more women to join the workforce, making it their priority to raise the number of women at Tesla from 33% to a 50-50 (Male-Female) workplace. We can expect Tesla to continue to grow as a corporation as well as its dominance in the sustainable energy market. Tesla is here to stay.

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